Country: Poland
Currency: Złoty (PLN)
Peak Season: June-October
Shoulder Season: April-May, December
Median Temperature: 7.70 C / 45.86 F
Main Languages: Polish, German, English, Russian
Primary Modes of Transportation: Bus, tram, underground metro, taxi
Recommended Duration of Stay: 4 days
Recommended Pocket Money: $100.00/day
Tourist Passes: Warsaw Tourist Card, ZTM Warszawa
Show your love by linking to us

Warsaw is the capital of Poland –a country that has been has gone down in history for the courage and hospitality exuded by its people, particularly in Word War 2, which in effect, led to the city being decimated, totaled, and having underwent an utterly deplorable status. But despite of all the devastation and casualties, the city has undergone unbelievably rapid post-war restorations and modernization faster than that of any other city in the world, which just goes to show how the Poles love their home.

50 years after the war and after Pope John Paul II’s address to instill democracy in the city, Warsaw has become a prominent tourist destination, often cited in international media as a booming business capital and one of the most flocked-to cities in Eastern Europe. We recommend reading Polish history before setting foot on the city – particularly Warsaw’s key role in safeguarding the Jews and retaliating against Nazi forces during WW2.

Dubbed as the “Paris of the East,” Warsaw lives to the compliment by offering tourists serene attractions and a vibrant history not worth overlooking. What’s also great about going here is that the neighborhoods housing the landmarks are equally impressive in their own merits.

Packing List

  • Clean-cut, layered apparel for the frosty/rainy weather; save the punky/skimpy clothes and disheveled hairdo for someplace else—even the youth of Warsaw prefer to dress simple
  • Converted currency, credit cards and debit card—dollars are hit in miss in some places; plastic is widely accepted, and ATM kiosks are strategically deployed near many tourist attractions
  • Essential medication and toiletries; almost all global brands are commercially available in Warsaw, sometimes branded/marketed under a different name—take note of the content
  • A decent point-and-shoot camera, portable media to keep you company, as well as pocket books while staying inside coffee shops; the weather may keep you indoors for a while
  • Portable grills/toasters and disposable servingware to save on restaurant food; staples and ingredients are cheap, so you bringing zip-locks and expandable shopping bags is helpful

Things to Do

  • Understanding Polish bravery and camaraderie by visiting Old Town, which has been meticulously rebuilt to its former luster after being razed to ruins in WWII
  • Encountering firsthand the covert documents, firearms, munitions and even vehicles used by the outnumbered resistance against the Nazis
  • Visiting the then-controversial Palace of Culture and Science (a “gift” from Stalin); the building has been the international performances by notable personalities
  • Witnessing Polish royalty in the guise of Baroque architecture inside the refurbished Royal Castle; albeit looking quaint from outside, the interior is stunning with white and gold, exuding of royalty
  • Strolling around breathtakingly verdant Lazienki Royal Park, host to a lake, the famed White House villa of Louis XVIII (during his exile from France), a few other palaces, edifices and buildings

DON'T

  • Rent a car, unless you have extensive experience driving on the right which, most tourists fail to realize, is harder than it looks
  • Forget to check mannerisms and words that translate to rudeness in Poland
  • Get drunk; Poles handle inebriety with grace have an unusually high alcohol tolerance (especially with vodka), so don’t fall for prey those “friendly” drinking competitions
  • Mention any vague or insidious remarks about WWII, Hitler, the Holocaust or the Jews; it is important leave rude commentaries on war and politics back at home
  • Board the metro cars and buses without purchasing a ticket, or else be levied a hefty fine