Country: Canada
Currency: Dollar (CAD)
Peak Season: June-September
Shoulder Season: February-May, September-October
Median Temperature: 8.90 C / 48.02 F
Main Languages: French, English
Primary Modes of Transportation: Subway, bus, streetcar, bicycle, taxi
Recommended Duration of Stay: 4 days
Recommended Pocket Money: $200.00/day
Tourist Passes: Toronto CityPASS
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Toronto is a youthful and classy city perfect for individuals, groups, and families wanting to have a good time up in the North. And should we say itís also Canadaís largest city and the forerunner in all the countryís industries. Canadians are known for the modesty and willingness to communicateóone will ponder why people in the US make fun of this great lot once you get here. Youíll even be surprised to know that there are probably more couples and families in the city than there are bachelors and slackers.

Since the turn of the 21st century, Toronto has been opening its gates more and more to expatriates, foreign students, and immigrant workers. In fact, nearly half of the population in the city are of diverse ethnicities, with the Asian community now sturdily growing and also playing a key role in the both the health care and technology industries. Coming from a faraway country, you wonít feel even the slightest hostility or snub from the locals. Honestly speaking, there could be no friendlier city than Toronto.

Toronto is known for its natural sceneries and beautiful landscapes, including the: Niagara Falls, Prince Edward County, High Park, Martin Goodman Trail, Edward Gardens, Sunnyside Park, and the Toronto Botanical Garden. Toronto also prides itself in promoting performing arts, to the point of nudging people inside hotels just to see an equally terrific stage show inside the acclaimed Centre for the Arts, Sony Centre, or Four Seasons Centre Ė thatís commitment for you.

Packing List

  • Very breathable summer apparel and added layers for the winterótemperatures are at polar opposites; Toronto is very windy, so itís ideal to wear jeans/Capri instead of a sundress
  • Essential medication and toiletries; most international brands are sold extensively in the city, so pack light on bottles and boxes and only bring country-specific brands
  • A decent camera and plenty of memory; high-end electronics and expensive jewelry can be brought to the city, since hotel robberies are relatively uncommon here
  • Comfortable walking shoes and a sizeable backpack; hostels are a bit far from major attractions and thereís always the chance of staying from one corner of the city to another
  • A coin holder to load all the $1 (loonies) and $2 (toonies) coins Canada is famous purse; it will prove useful on the transit system and kiosks

Things to Do

  • Very breathable summer apparel and added layers for the winterótemperatures are at polar opposites; Toronto is very windy, so itís ideal to wear jeans/Capri instead of a sundress
  • Essential medication and toiletries; most international brands are sold extensively in the city, so pack light on bottles and boxes and only bring country-specific brands
  • A decent camera and plenty of memory; high-end electronics and expensive jewelry can be brought to the city, since hotel robberies are relatively uncommon here
  • Comfortable walking shoes and a sizeable backpack; hostels are a bit far from major attractions and thereís always the chance of staying from one corner of the city to another
  • A coin holder to load all the $1 (loonies) and $2 (toonies) coins Canada is famous purse; it will prove useful on the transit system and kiosks

DON'T

  • Mistake American manners to those of Canadaís; in a nutshell, Canadians are more reserved and are easily appalled by rude gestures; address them by their academic title whenever possible
  • Practice eating and walking/standing along the sidewalks; itís considered bad form; arriving late for parties/dinners has been the norm, although punctuality isnít so bad except for the jeering
  • Be afraid to ask anyone for instructions; being part of its multicultural/immigrant culture, Torontonians will even help you out even if both of you donít speak the same language
  • Throw a hissy fit or argue on public spaces; needless to say, be informed of remarks and words that are considered racist or intolerant of religion in the country
  • Smoke in public spaces and inside private establishments; you wonít find any smokerís area inside bars and restaurants since Toronto has been keen on disavowing the use of nicotine products